Gynaecologist attacked in Pune for refusing to perform illegal abortion

first_imgIn yet another incident of violence against the medical fraternity, a city-based gynaecologist was assaulted by a gang after he reportedly refused to perform an illegal abortion.The incident occurred late Saturday night in Pune’s Sangvi area after Dr. Amol Bidkar, a gynaecologist-pregnancy doctor with the Sakhi Maternity Centre, was attacked with a long-bladed weapon (‘koyta’) after he refused to terminate the foetus of a young woman in the fifth month of her pregnancy. “A man had approached Dr. Bidkar a fortnight ago to perform the operation, but he refused on grounds that it was illicit as the foetus was more than 20 weeks old. On Saturday, at around 9 p.m., a gang of ruffians led by the man broke into his clinic and pressed him to reconsider. One person stood outside the doctor’s cabin while one stood out on watch outside the clinic. When Dr. Bidkar flatly refused, he was assaulted with a sharp weapon and sustained injuries on his shoulder. Fortunately, he is out of danger,” said Dr. Pradeep Nanaware, president, Sangvi-Pimple Gurav Doctors Association.He said that the attack was typical of a spate of incidents since last year where doctors were targeted, either by the unruly kin of patients or by out-of-control persons whose unreasonable demands were refused by medical personnel.On Sunday morning, a number of doctors from the Sangvi-Pimple Gurav Doctors association gathered at the Sangvi police station and demanded that the miscreants be nabbed immediately. A complaint has been lodged under relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).Last year in July, irate relatives of a deceased patient had savagely assaulted two resident doctors in the city’s Sassoon General Hospital, accusing them of ‘negligence’.The incident provoked a storm of condemnation at the time with the Maharashtra Association of Resident Doctors (MARD) castigating the State government for paying scant attention to the security of resident doctors and calling for a strike which paralysed medical services in Pune and Pimpri-Chinchwad for nearly a week.last_img read more

Ahmednagar cop commits suicide

first_imgPune: An assistant police constable attached to the local crime branch in Ahmednagar district allegedly committed suicide on Sunday morning, said police sources. Krushna Waghmare’s body was found near a jogging track in the district’s Savedi locality. According to the police, Waghmare, who had a month left before retirement from active service, left a suicide note saying that “no one be held responsible for his actions”. “He was of a calm disposition. So, this extreme step is perplexing,” said an officer from the Topkhana police station, where the case is being investigated. Mr. Waghmare had assisted in drawing up charge sheets in two of the most notorious crimes in the State in recent years: the rape and murder of a girl in Kopardi in July last year, and the triple murder in Javkhede-Khalasa in October 2014.last_img read more

Plan for liquor shop at Srinagar airport shelved

first_imgFaced with growing protests in Kashmir, the State government and the Airports Authority of India (AAI) on Friday shelved the proposal to have the first-ever duty-free liquor shop at the Srinagar International Airport. “The AAI has been intimated that the J&K Excise Department shall not grant liquor licence for opening a liquor shop or vend at the Srinagar International Airport in violation of the provisions of the J&K Excise Act, 1958, and the liquor Licence and Sales Rules, 1984,” said Excise Commissioner Javed Khan.An AAI spokesman said: “It is observed through the media and the social media that a section of society is against having duty free liquor shop at the airport. Honouring local sentiments, the AAI has decided to cancel the tender process.” It was hoped that with this communication all controversies would be set at rest, said the AAI spokesman.Netizens, religious organisations and separatists had attacked the government for floating tenders to open a liquor shop. Hurriyat chairman Mirwaiz Umar Farooq, also head priest of the Valley, had described it as “highly condemnable and a shameful act on the part of the ruling party”.last_img read more

Fire damages 600-year-old shrine damaged in Srinagar

first_imgThe shrine Saint Mir Sayyid Ali Hamadani in Srinagar was built in 1395 by Shah Sikandar. It houses exquisite woodcarvings and papier-mâché artwork, modelled on the Persian artworks of the 13 and 14 century.Read the full report here.last_img

Forensic team collects samples in rape, murder of seven-year-old girl

first_imgA forensic science team from Kota on Sunday collected samples from the spot in Mogya Beh village of Rajasthan’s Jhalawar district, where the body of a seven-year-old girl was found on Saturday. The post-mortem has established that the minor girl was raped and strangled to death.The girl’s parents had lodged a complaint with the police, saying that she was playing outside her home and had gone missing. After a search, the police found the body about 250 metres away from her home on Saturday evening.A special team, headed by a DSP, has launched a hunt to nab the accused, suspecting that someone known to the girl might have committed the crime. The police said a dog squad would be arriving shortly from Kota to join the probe.The tribal-dominated Mogya Beh village falls in the Aklera block of Jhalawar district. Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje represents Jhalrapatan Assembly constituency in the district. The police have registered a rape and murder case, while the body was cremated on Sunday.Aklera Block Medical Officer Dwarkalal Meena, who along with two other doctors, conducted the autopsy, said the girl had died of asphyxia due to strangulation of throat. The death had occurred within 24 hours before the post-mortem, he said.BJP MLA from Aklera, Kanwar Lal, said forensic probe had helped solve a similar case reported in Jhalawar in February, when a six-year-old girl was found murdered in an agricultural field. However, Pradesh Congress president Sachin Pilot said this was yet another addition to the increasing rape cases in the State amid a “pathetic law and order situation” under the BJP government.last_img read more

Monsoon session of Odisha Assembly begins today

first_imgThe monsoon session of the Odisha Assembly is scheduled to begin here from Tuesday. The session will continue till September 20 and have 11 working days.The House will pay tributes to the memory of former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who passed away recently, on the opening day.The supplementary budget was to be presented during the winter session of the Assembly. The State government, however, has decided to present the supplementary budget in the monsoon session to allocate funds for a host of populist schemes announced by it in the recent months.The supplementary budget will have provisions for recently announced schemes such as the Biju Swasthya Kalyan Yojana and the State food security scheme besides the routine allocations for other schemes.Meanwhile, the Opposition parties, the Congress and the BJP, said that they would raise issues such as unemployment, corruption and farmers’ problems in the monsoon session. The Congress has already identified issues like non-payment of insurance money to farmers, the BJD’s efforts to set up a Vidhan Parishad without taking Opposition parties into confidence, while the BJP would raise issues such as percentage commission in government offices, farmers’ problems and alleged hijacking of central schemes by the state government.“We will raise unemployment problem in a big way,” Leader of Opposition Narasinha Mishra of the Congress said.With PTI inputslast_img read more

Rahul Gandhi on two-day visit to Amethi

first_imgCongress President Rahul Gandhi is on a two-day tour of his parliamentary constituency Amethi starting Wednesday.Mr. Gandhi said he would meet and discuss issues with people in his home constituency.“I am coming to Amethi. Will be with my people and discuss issues with them. Will keep sharing the details of my story of happiness with you by way of pictures,” Mr. Gandhi said in a Facebook post. During his stay, Mr. Gandhi is scheduled to meet representatives of gram panchayats at Fursatganj. He will also take part in the swearing-in of newly elected bar members in Gauriganj, his representative Chandrakant Dubey had said.Mr. Gandhi will address a ‘nukkad sabha’ at Haliyapur and stay the night at Bhueymau guest house, where he will meet party workers on the second day of his visit before leaving for Delhi, Mr. Dubey had said. Mr. Gandhi was scheduled to visit Amethi on January 4 but it was cancelled in view of the Winter session of Parliament. His visit would have clashed with Union Minister Smriti Irani’s Amethi trip, which was also scheduled for the same day and was being seen as the first major political face-off ahead of the general elections. The Congress chief will also tour states like Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh in the coming days.last_img read more

Internet shut as stir against citizenship Bill intensifies in Manipur

first_imgThe BJP-led Manipur government on Tuesday imposed restrictions under Section 144 in Imphal East and West districts besides suspending mobile internet services as protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2016, intensified.The Bill seeks to hasten the process of granting citizenship to six non-Muslim groups from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Pakistan.Leaders of People’s Alliance Manipur (PAM), an umbrella organisation of civil bodies, said the police prevented people from coming out of their homes. But many defied restrictions to carry out black flag protests while women vendors continued to squat in and around the Ima Keithel, considered Asia’s largest all-woman market, in State capital Imphal.Eyes on NPPThe PAM had called a 36-hour Statewide shutdown in Manipur from 5 a.m. on Monday.Mizoram too witnessed widespread protests against the Bill with hundreds spilling on to the streets of Aizawl holding placards, some of which read ‘Hello Independence’. In Meghalaya, the ruling National People’s Party (NPP) reiterated its decision to sever its ties with the BJP if the Bill is passed in the Rajya Sabha. The NPP has 20 MLAs in the ruling coalition comprising 36 legislators in the 60-member Meghalaya Assembly with an effective strength of 59 after the death of one MLA.One of the allies of NPP in Meghalaya is the BJP, which has two legislators. Both have threatened to quit the party if the Bill is passed.Severing ties with BJP might not affect the NPP-led coalition government in Meghalaya, but it is likely to threaten the existence of the BJP-led Manipur government, though N. Biren Singh has opposed the Bill.The NPP has four MLAs in Manipur where the strength of the BJP-led coalition is 31, the simple majority mark in the House of 60. In Nagaland, the NPP has two MLAs in the ruling coalition that, like Manipur, has a strength of 31 in the 60-member Assembly. Withdrawal of support by the NPP could thus spell trouble for the coalition government headed by Neiphiu Rio.last_img read more

Naveen inaugurates drinking water project

first_imgOdisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik inaugurated the much-awaited ₹431-crore Janibili drinking water project for Berhampur and rural areas of Ganjam district on Sunday.During the ceremony in Berhampur, he also launched the ‘Smart Park’ scheme for 114 urban centres in the State. As part of the ongoing ‘Unnati Yojana’ in the State, more than 200 parks with an array of amenities will be developed in these urban areas over the next six months at a cost of ₹200 crore.Mr. Patnaik said that the State government has decided to implement the Seventh Pay Commission recommendations for all employees of urban local bodies in Odisha. Another project launched was renovation and development of crematoriums with toilets, changing rooms, drinking water facility and provision for devotional music in these urban centres. This project is being taken up at a cost of ₹200 crore.First phase of the Janibili project became operational from Sunday. The government has termed it the first ‘integrated mega water supply project’ of Odisha. Apart from Berhampur, this project will benefit Berhampur city and 53 villages in 16 panchayats. As per an estimate, it will supply 300 lakh litres of drinking water to over five lakh inhabitants of these areas through a 253-km-long network of pipeline.A large reservoir has been built at Janibili in Dharakote block of Ganjam district. Water would be brought to Jagdalpur on the outskirts of Berhampur for purification by a 55-km-long pipeline. The 53 villages on the pipeline’s path will also get water from it. Earlier Berhampur was getting 54 Million Litres per Day from the Dakhinpur reservoir and the Rushikulya drinking water supply system, while its requirement was 64 MLD or more. Drinking water was becoming too scarce during the summer months and had to be supplied through tankers to several areas of the city.last_img read more

SDF announces names of 18 candidates

first_imgSikkim Democratic Front president and Chief Minister Pawan Kumar Chamling on Friday announced the names of 18 SDF candidates for the Assembly election, dropping nine sitting MLAs including Speaker K.N. Rai and three Ministers.Seeking 8th term Mr. Rai, who was elected in 2014 from Poklok Kamrang seat in South Sikkim, has been denied nomination this time as the Chief Minister himself has decided to contest from this constituency.Mr. Chamling, who is seeking election for the eighth successive term, will also contest from his traditional seat, Namchi Singithang in South Sikkim which he had won by a convincing margin in the 2014 polls too.He has dropped three Ministers — Sher Bahadur Subedi, Arjun Kumar Ghatani and Tulsi Devi Rai — and replaced them with new candidates. Five other ruling party MLAs have been denied renomination in the first list of candidates.The 18 candidates are — Dechen Ongmu Bhutia (Yoksam-Tashiding), N.K. Subba (Maneybong-Dentam), I.M. Sharma (Gyalshing Barnyak), K.S. Lepcha (Rinchenpong), Pem Norbu Sherpa (Daramdin), Dhan Kumari Kami (Salghari-Zoom), Pawan Chamling (Poklok Kamrang), Pawan Chamling (Namchi Singithang), The other candidates are Pharwanti Tamang (Melli), Birjan Tamang (Namthang Rateypani), G.M. Gurung (Temi Namphing), Raj Kumar Thapa (Rangang Yangang), Ugen T. Gyatso Bhutia (Tumen Lingi), D.T. Lepcha (Gnathang-Machong), Em Prasad Shara (Namcheybung), G.T. Dhungel (Upper Tadong), Pintso Chopel Lepcha (Gangtok) and Pintso Namgyal Lepcha (Djongu).Of the 18 candidates named, three are women — Dhan Kumar Kami (Salghari Zoom), Pharwanti Tamang (Melli) and Raj Kumari Thapa (Rangang-Yangyang), and two women MLAs — Tulshi Devi Rai (Melli) and Tilu Gurung (Namthang Ratepaney) — have been denied renomination. The candidates for the 14 remaining seats will be announced later, SDF spokesperson Kisor Kharka said.last_img read more

Blaze below PM’s stage, three booked

first_imgThree persons including an electricity contractor were booked on Sunday for “negligence” after a short circuit caused a minor fire under the stage on which Prime Minister Narendra Modi was delivering his speech here. Senior Superintendent of Police Akash Kulhari said, The wiring of air-conditioning circuit got overheated and accidentally caught fire. He said the security staff immediately doused the fire before any damage could be done. The Prime Minister’s continued his speech uninterrupted while the security personnel tackled the mishap without anyone knowing about it, he said, adding an enquiry has been ordered.last_img read more

Painkillers May Curb Memory Loss From Medical Marijuana

first_imgMedical marijuana can alleviate pain and nausea, but it can also cause decreased attention span and memory loss. A new study in mice finds that taking an over-the-counter pain medication like ibuprofen may help curb these side effects.  “This is what we call a seminal paper,” says Giovanni Marsicano, a neuroscientist at the University of Bordeaux in France who was not involved in the work. If the results hold true in humans, they “could broaden the medical use of marijuana,” he says. “Many people in clinical trials are dropping out from treatments, because they say, ‘I cannot work anymore. I am stoned all the time.’ ”People have used marijuana for hundreds of years to treat conditions such as chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy. Studies in mice have shown that it can reduce some of the neural damage seen in Alzheimer’s disease. The main psychoactive ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat anorexia in AIDS patients and the nausea triggered by chemotherapy. Although recreational drug users usually smoke marijuana, patients prescribed THC take it as capsules. Many people find the side effects hard to bear, however.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The exact cause of these side effects is unclear. In the brain, THC binds to receptors called CB1 and CB2, which are involved in neural development as well as pain perception and appetite. The receptors are normally activated by similar compounds, called endocannabinoids, that are produced by the human body. When one of these compounds binds to CB1, it suppresses the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The enzyme has many functions. For instance, painkillers such as ibuprofen and aspirin work by blocking COX-2. Researchers have hypothesized that the suppression of COX-2 could be the cause of THC’s side effects, such as memory problems.But that’s not what researchers found in the new study. A team led by Chu Chen, a neuroscientist at Louisiana State University in New Orleans, discovered that giving THC to mice increased the activity of COX-2. Blocking this activation alleviated the memory and learning problems triggered by THC. For instance, mice that received a dose of THC daily for a week had problems remembering the location of a hidden platform in a water tank. If COX-2 was blocked, however, mice given THC found the platform just as fast as mice that were not treated with THC did. This result suggests “that the unwanted side effects of cannabis could be eliminated or reduced … by administering a COX-2 inhibitor,” the authors write today in Cell.Raul Gonzalez, a psychologist at Florida International University in Miami, praises the “elegant set of experiments.” But he warns that it is not clear whether inhibiting COX-2 blocks the beneficial effects of marijuana. In the study, Chen and colleagues showed that some positive impacts of THC, such as those observed in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, are still seen if the mice also receive a COX-2 inhibitor. But such an inhibitor may still interfere with the positive effects of THC on other disorders such as AIDS, Gonzalez writes in an e-mail. “It is much too early to tell, but the current study will undoubtedly spur some exciting new research.”One conclusion of the paper is that THC and endocannabinoids can cause opposite effects when they bind to CB1, Marsicano says. That suggests that it may be too simple to think of a receptor like CB1 as a mere switch that always does the same thing if it is activated, he says. For instance, CB1 may come in slightly different forms, and THC may be particularly good at binding to only one of these forms.The authors argue that a painkiller like aspirin may also prevent some of the downsides of cannabis abuse. But Gonzalez cautions that smoked cannabis contains many more active compounds than THC does, and they may also be involved in harming the memory and other side effects.As for people who use marijuana recreationally, taking ibuprofen as well might kill the buzz they’re looking for, Marsicano says. For instance, he says, impairments in working memory may make people prone to jump from one topic to the next during conversation, and they may have fun doing that. “So what we call side effects may attract people to marijuana in the first place.”last_img read more

ScienceShot: Unlikely Ally Helps Red Squirrel Fight Invader

first_imgFor more than a century, invasive gray squirrels have bullied their way across Ireland, outcompeting and drastically reducing the native red squirrel population. But a new study finds that the red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris, pictured) has acquired an unlikely ally: its natural predator, the pine marten. The find comes thanks to a 2007 ecological survey, which noted an unexpected decline in the number of North American eastern gray squirrels (S. carolinensis) on the island—and a concomitant rise in the number of pine martens (Martes martes), cat-sized, squirrel-eating carnivores. Researchers collected pine marten feces and hair samples from areas with and without gray squirrels. Finding places where the two species overlapped was so difficult that the researchers used a specially trained scent dog to track down pine marten scat in gray squirrel–populated areas. Where pine martens were plentiful, red squirrels thrived alongside their natural predator, the team will report next month in Biodiversity and Conservation. The feces revealed that not only had pine martens added gray squirrels to their diets, but that they were also feasting on the invasive species eight times more often than on red squirrels. The researchers believe the red squirrels acquired defenses against predation, such as better tree-climbing skills, as they coevolved with the pine marten, giving them a leg up on their non-native competition. (The gray squirrel originally came to Ireland in 1911 when a wedding gift of a dozen squirrels escaped into the wild.) As Ireland’s pine marten population continues to recover thanks to habitat protection and antihunting laws, a red squirrel resurgence may be less of a nutty idea.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Humans not solely to blame for passenger pigeon extinction

first_imgWhen the last passenger pigeon died at a zoo in 1914, the species became a cautionary tale of the dramatic impact humans can have on the world. But a new study finds that the bird experienced multiple population booms and crashes over the million years before its final demise. The sensitivity of the population to natural fluctuations, the authors argue, could have been what made it so vulnerable to extinction.“This is a very nice piece of research,” says paleornithologist Helen James of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., who was not involved in the work. “I hope we can take what we learn from this and begin to build better ways of determining a species’ extinction risk.”In the 1800s, the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), named after the French word passager for “passing by,” was the most abundant bird in the world. It accounted for more than a quarter of all birds in North America, with an estimated population of 3 billion to 5 billion. The species traveled in enormous flocks, as wide as a mile and many miles long, and could strip an area of nuts within days. When the last passenger pigeon died in 1914, ecologists blamed deforestation and overhunting; the bird had become a popular source of cheap meat for both human consumption and livestock feed. But the story didn’t add up for everyone.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“We thought that some piece was probably missing in this puzzle,” says Chih-Ming Hung, a biologist at National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei. “If people are just killing pigeons one by one, even combined with habitat loss, it’s still hard to believe they can go down in number so fast.”Hung and his colleagues collected tiny tissue samples from four well-preserved passenger pigeons held at museums around the world and used cutting-edge genetic technology to sequence the animals’ DNA, as well as the DNA of a modern relative, the domestic pigeon. By comparing the genes from each bird, Hung’s team was able to determine how the overall passenger pigeon population had changed over the years. At any given time, a smaller population of birds means less genetic diversity.Hung found that before Europeans settled in North America, the passenger pigeon population was already far from steady. Instead, the number of pigeons had fluctuated by up to 1000-fold during multiple population shrinkages and growths over the previous million years. Such massive fluctuations aren’t typical for any species. The researchers suspect that climate-driven shifts in the availability of acorns, one of the pigeon’s primary food sources, might be responsible. These shifts  matched up with the fluctuations in population size. But they have no way to prove the connection.The findings suggest that the passenger pigeons’ extinction may not have been solely due to human influence. Instead, the double whammy of an already natural population decline coupled with the pressures of hunting and population loss may have done the bird in, Hung and colleagues report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “If it’s already on this track, human influence can further increase the speed that the population goes down,” Hung says. “And once it gets down to some really low level, there’s no way for the birds to recover.”Beth Shapiro, a paleogenomics researcher at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who also studies the passenger pigeon’s genetic past, says the new data are encouraging and fit with her own group’s unpublished findings. “I think the discovery that their populations regularly fluctuate in size makes these birds even more fascinating,” she says. “This is not what we consider normal behavior.”More work will still be needed, though, she points out, to fill in gaps in the pigeons’ natural history. The genetic data show only very long-term trends, and thus don’t reveal what the birds’ last decades were like. It’s also unclear which biological properties of the passenger pigeons made them so prone to population fluctuations. If biologists can answer these questions, Shapiro says, they may be able to identify other species that, while they are plentiful in number and not considered at risk of extinction by classical methods, could be in danger of an unexpected die-off.last_img read more

Bulgaria and Hungary volunteer for E.U. scrutiny of their research systems

first_imgBRUSSELS—Bulgaria and Hungary are the first E.U. member states to enlist the European Commission’s help to reform their research policies. The two Eastern European countries will receive advice from external reviewers as part of the commission’s new Policy Support Facility (PSF), announced here yesterday.Endowed with a budget of up to €20 million until 2020, the PSF provides “a sort of technical aid,” E.U. research commissioner Carlos Moedas told reporters. Moedas praised the countries for signing up for the scheme. “Having a [science] minister [who] says: ‘we are committed to doing the reforms, please come with independent experts and tell me if I’m doing the right thing’; I think it takes a lot of courage,” said Moedas, who presented the plan with Bulgaria’s science minister Todor Tanev.Bulgaria has requested “peer-review” and advice in three policy areas: public funding of research, science careers, and knowledge transfer from academia to business. The commission has assembled a group of five external reviewers and five “peers”—senior government officials involved in research policy in their own country. The panel, led by Luc Soete, rector of Maastricht University in the Netherlands, will conduct country visits in April and June and is expected to provide recommendations by the end of July.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)This kind of exercise is not entirely new: there have been reviews of national science systems in the past, for instance through consulting companies or the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. But Soete says PSF could carry more weight if its recommendations are linked to the European Semester, the commission’s yearly assessment of economic reforms in member states. Currently, the commission’s prescriptions focus largely on budget discipline, but armed with PSF’s reviews, it could make stronger recommendations about research and innovation reforms. (All member states have signed up to align their policies under the European Semester, but its recommendations remain nonbinding.)The commission has agreed to prepare the ground for a similar exercise in Hungary later in the year. Other countries, including Italy and Poland, have expressed an interest in putting their research policies under the microscope as well. Although any E.U. member state or associated country can apply, the expectation is that PSF will be most in demand in Eastern and Southern Europe, where science is often struggling. “The countries that feel the strongest pressure as being underperforming [will] be the first to knock on the door,” while other countries “wait and see,” Soete says. Still, “I wouldn’t be surprised if many countries took advantage of this” eventually, he adds.Governments who use PSF will also be able to get practical help from the commission officials to roll out reforms.last_img read more

How more and more Indian students and professionals are choosing Canada over the US

first_imgThough the 1,86,267 Indian students enrolled in US campuses in 2016-17 still outnumber the 1,00,000 studying in Canada, the latter is showing a significant rise in numbers. In 2016, 52,870 Indian study-permit holders went to Canada, but in 2017 the figure is already 54,425 (till October). On the other hand, the number of fresh visas (for those wishing to study in the issued to students in India was 62,537 in 2016-drop of 16.4% over the previous year.One of the important attractions of Canada for students is the fact it is 30-40% cheaper the US, even at top universities and colleges. Besides, Trump’s stance on immigration and concerns over racist incidents are taking the shine off US campuses.Read it at Economic Times Related Itemslast_img read more

NRIs And Directorship in Indian Firms

first_imgIndia continues to witness a steady flow of global companies setting up or expanding their operations in India. Generally, their preferred option from a legal structure perspective is a private limited company. Both the new as well as existing Indian subsidiaries of foreign companies tend to depute trusted foreign personnel/non-resident Indians (NRIs) employed with them as flag-bearers in India in the form of directors or other key managerial personnel.Read it at Live Mint Related Itemslast_img read more

Polo Ball Makers of Deulpur

first_imgRanjit Mal takes pride in calling himself the last man on earth who can shape polo balls from a bamboo strip. Over the past four decades, his skillful hands have shaped several thousand polo balls that have been struck by long-handled mallets on polo grounds across the globe.The sixty-year-old hails from the non-descript village of Deulpur in the Howrah district of West Bengal, 25 kilometers from the state capital of Kolkata. The village surrounded with lush greenery and ponds was once the hub of bamboo polo ball manufacturing, exporting to the United Kingdom, United States and other countries. But fiber-glass polo balls, commonly known as Argentinean balls, have dealt a deadly blow to the bamboo polo ball industry.Mal, who fiddles around at his tinned-roof spartan home in the village, recollects that he barely had time to grab food during the heydays of the business. “I used to work for several hours at a stretch. The work load made it difficult to take a break as the orders were huge, forcing the laborers to run against time to meet the deadlines,” he says, taking a trip down memory lane.The septuagenarian, who still makes balls for a local trader, says that the process of ball making has remained unchanged since its inception over a century ago: “It has historically been a labor-intensive industry and the entire work is done manually.”The village was particularly well suited for the polo balls because of the availability of bamboo roots. Mal says: “The massive, solid bamboo rhizome, which is the underground part of the stem, are from tropical bamboo species such as Guadua. The giant bamboo rhizomes are dug as they are all interconnected. The rhizomes are then soaked in a pond for 18-20 days. The balls carved out of these jads (roots) must be exactly three-and-a-half inches in diameter and weigh 0.15 kg or else they are rejected. The balls are done after a double coat of white Asian wall paint.”He laments that days are not far off when bamboo ball making will find a place in the folklore and pages of history. This cradle of wooden polo balls has virtually nobody left to take its rich legacy forward.Subhas Chandra Baug, who has switched from manufacturing polo balls to mallets, claims his great grandfather, Bipin Bihari Baug had started the business in 1860 in the village. “Though my grandfather was not much educated, he had a friend who spoke smattering English. It helped him to forge good relations with the sahibs (Englishmen) who used to play polo.  He smelled an opportunity and advised my great grandfather to make wooden balls, which would be in demand as the game grows. My grandfather was reluctant, but acquiesced,” he says, recalling anecdotes shared with him by his father.The risk eventually paid off when two British soldiers, Captain Robert Stewart and Joe Sherer, established the Calcutta Polo Club in 1862. The demand of the polo balls grew manifold.The polo clubs depended on Deulpur for their balls needs. The business got a major boost with the formation of the Indian Polo Association in 1892. The country boasted of 100 clubs by 1900. Bamboo balls were supplied by Deulpur craftsmen across the country.Baug says that the trade remained largely restricted to India until 1945 when his father and uncle stepped into the business and established Baug Brothers: “During the days of my great grandfather, the export was done indirectly through a woman named Eromm. She ran a company by her name and purchased balls from Deulpur and exported them to European countries. My father and uncle realized a huge potential in the business and decided to export directly. Moreover, Eromm sold her company and left India in 1947.”Subsequently, Baug Brothers was set up by his father Satish Chandra Baug and his uncle Jugal Kishore Baug in 1950: “They took the correct decision and became a major exporter of wooden balls within a few years as the balls were preferred, because they produced a whistling sound due to friction with the air that helped the player to hear the ball coming and thus avoid getting hit by it.”Among several clients of Baug Brothers, J. Salter and Sons of the United Kingdom was the biggest importer of balls from the village, ordering more than 100,000 of the 250,000 balls exported annually.J. Salter and Sons, established by James Oliver Salter, an Englishman in 1884, imported bamboo balls from India and Pakistan and gave finishing touches in Aldershot, adding the Salter brand name. The company is now owned by Sean Arnold Sporting Antiques, but has stopped importing wooden balls.The business brought huge profits and Deulpur boasted four major manufacturers and exporters of polo balls, including Baug Brothers, Kolley Das, Baug Company and Hazra & Sons.  More than 100 families were directly and indirectly involved in the business.“During the 1970s and 1980s, the balls had huge demand in the United States, England, Australia, Nigeria and even in the Indian states of Jaipur, Manipur and Calcutta (now Kolkata) where the game was mostly played,” says Baug.In 1990 fiber-glass polo balls from Argentina were introduced into the market. Though the Argentinian balls are far more expensive than wooden ones, they are preferred because of their uniform weight and they last much longer, virtually decimating the wood ball industry.All the four major Deulpur players have stopped manufacturing wooden polo balls and the laborers have switched to other professions. The tin shades that once housed factories have been replaced by residential buildings.The annual polo ball production, which once stood at 250,000 balls, has dwindled to just 2,000 balls. Mal is the sole laborer still engaged in its manufacture: “I supply balls to Subhas, which he sells to polo clubs for practice sessions, as the ball is no more used in any tournaments. I earn a paltry Rs 3,000 a month and had quit the work, but for my old age and lack of opportunities.”Subhas says, that he had sent his last consignment of around 7,000 balls to UK in 1993.  Since then there have been no orders. He has also changed the name of the company to SC Baug & Sons and deals in manufacturing and selling mallets: “I have started dealing in mallets and have set-up a factory in my home. I want to remain connected with the sport in whichever way I can, because it is an emotional bond that was forged by my forefathers.”He adds with a sense of pride that polo has brought him in close contact with major industrialists, such as Naveen Jindal and Maharani Gayatri Devi of Jaipur, who was a reputed horse rider and polo player.Rabindranath Baug, whose grandfather launched Baug Company in 1884 after being inspired by the success of Bipin Bihari Baug, says that fiber-glass balls have devoured their business. “Each wooden balls costs between Rs 80-100,  compared to its fiber counterpart that is available for around Rs 350-400. Yet people prefer to buy the Argentina balls because of longevity. Normally, around 2,000 bamboo balls are required for a tournament as the wood cracks after being hit hard regularly. They have to be discarded at regular intervals. The fiber-glass balls don’t come with such disadvantage and 500 balls are enough for the tournament.”Samir Suhag, the captain of the Indian Polo team and an Arjuna awardee, is sympathetic to the fate of bamboo balls, but also points to their weaknesses: “The game has become quite fast and fiber balls have succeeded only because of their longer life. The players have moved away from bamboo balls because the industry has failed to make perfect and long lasting balls and keep tab with the changing times. Still, I am ready to offer my best for their revival and want to see the bamboo balls used across the globe.”As the dusk covers the sky, the narrow pathways of Deulpur are teeming with freewheeling children, who will grow up perhaps unaware of the special place their village once had in the history of polo. Related Itemslast_img read more

We’ve taken the drubbing as a challenge: RJD

first_imgThe Rashtriya Janata Dal on Wednesday asserted that the party was united and it would contest the Assembly poll in 2020 under Tejashwi Yadav’s leadership. “With the electoral defeat we’re down but not out…we’ll introspect and do a booth-wise survey of our defeat…we’ve taken the drubbing as a challenge”, State RJD chief Ram Chandra Purve saidafter the party’s two-day meeting ended. The RJD had called the meeting of party leaders and legislators to mull over its humiliating defeat in the Lok Sabha poll. Out of 20 seats it contested, the RJD couldn’t win even a single seat. At the meeting, Mr. Tejashwi, who is also the Leader of the Opposition in the Assembly, said the RJD would go to the people and apprise them of the NDA’s dubious tactics.The party constituted a three-member panel comprising senior party leaders Jagdanand Singh, Abdul Bari Siddiqui and Alok Mehta to interact with party workers and leaders to examine the reasons behind the party’s poor performance in the Lok Sabha poll. The panel will submit its report in two weeks. Earlier, senior party leader Raghuvansh Prasad Singh had said that “the delay in seat-sharing arrangement and uneven distribution of tickets” had led to the party’s defeat. He had also admitted that the “mahagathbandhan was not united.”Mr.Singh,who had lost from Vaishali to Lok Janshakti Party candidate Veena Devi, also said the rift between Mr. Tejashwi and Tej Pratap, the two sons of Lalu Prasad, was one of the reasons for the party’s drubbing. He also curtly said that “those who have doubts about Tejashwi’s leadership should quit the RJD and the mahagathbandhan.” Soon after the results, RJD MLA from Gaighat in Muzaffarpur, Maheshwar Yadav, had demanded Mr. Tejashwi’s resignation as Leader of the Opposition on “moral grounds”. After the RJD meeting, leaders of the mahagathbandhan reached former CM Rabri Devi’s residence for a meeting. Alliance party leaders Sharad Yadav, Upendra Kushwaha, Mukesh Sahni attended it but no leader from the State Congress came. “I was not aware of any such meeting…I’ve come to Darbhnaga on urgent work”, State Congress chief Madan Mohan Jha said. Earlier, some State Congress leaders had called for snapping of ties with the RJD. “The party must get off the crutches it has used for the past three decades…it must work to strengthen its own cadre and support base”, senior State Congress leader Sadanand Singh had told journalists on Tuesday. Other party leaders like Abdul Jalil Mastan and others too had echoed similar sentiments while, senior party leader and MLC Prem Chandra Mishra said, “whatever party leaders have to say they should say it in the party forum.”Meanwhile, imprisoned RJD chief Lalu Prasad Yadav tweeted on Tuesday: “Opposition parties had the common goal to dislodge the BJP but failed to build a national narrative. The result in a particular election can never alter the reality, in as diverse and plural a country as India.”last_img read more